Analogue Glitch and Linear Distortion of the Body

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The work Analogue Glitch and Linear Body Distortion is an embodied experiment and reaction to the notion of technology and deference, where a user of technology might begin to defer to an expert maker to understand the tool, which itself offers interaction only on the surface.

Apprehension or to apprehend (to understand) has an etymological link to the prehensile act of grasping, where to see was to touch – where to understand, was to physically engage with the tool. Thus the glitching technology could be suggested to slip from the control of the everyday user, where we might for purposes of an interesting conversation connect the idea of control loosely to the body and the body’s ability to grasp to fix technology. Our relationship to the glitch becomes more deferential when the tool itself lacks a physical presence that we can tinker with or shape. Does this distance from the body with layers of obfuscation (hiding) help to promote the idea of the magical. Where aberrations on screens and in feedback seem like alchemy?

The artist has looked to exacerbate the mistake (and undermine the magical) by projecting hand drawn lines through a 35mm slide projector; the mistake is heightened by the equipment and not created by it. To draw the body back in the artist responds to the vibrations of the drawing, further exemplifying  the glitch and allowing a haptic connection with the body in space. The body becomes itself a site for pushing the natural aberration of the drawn line, reacting to the linear disruption and making further disruptions.

Work created at Guerrilla Art Lab, Nottingham

Tetrad Glitch from Chipped Pale on Vimeo.

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